Enterprise Bank Honors Jenike & Johanson As Business Of The Year

2013 Celebration of Excellence Awards recognizes Jenike & Johanson’s Leadership and Tenacity

May 8, 2013 – Tyngsboro, MA – On Tuesday evening, May 7 2013, before over 1,800 business and community leaders, Enterprise Bank presented its 2013 Celebration of Excellence “Business of the Year” Award to Jenike & Johanson, Inc. This award recognizes and honors successful, local businesses for their financial achievement, positive workplace environment, and continued community impact.

Despite its small size compared to the size of their clients, Jenike & Johanson is the largest firm of its type and has the most complete solids flow testing laboratory in the world. Under the leadership of President John W. Carson and CEO Herman Purutyan, the company prevailed through the recent economic downturn without eliminating staff and has resumed its pre-recession growth. Combining international joint ventures in Canada and Chile with its U.S. company to create Jenike & Johanson Global, the company expanded into Perth, Australia in 2012, and plans to open offices in Houston and Brazil this year.

“Two keys to our success are a passion to offer value and top quality service to our clients while providing a rewarding and stimulating workplace for our employees”, said Dr. Carson.

Jenike & Johanson strongly encourages employees to contribute their energies and resources in giving back to their communities, with the company’s management serving as role models, allowing employees to take time off for charitable work.

“While much has changed in the nearly fifty years since Dr. Andrew Jenike started the company in his basement, his philosophy, vision and goals for the company remain constant: create value for employees, clients and shareholders, as well as for its communities”, said Dr. Carson. “I’m proud to see how this company has grown in the 42 years I’ve been here and I look forward with confidence as a new generation of employees is taking over”.

About Jenike & Johanson, Inc.

Jenike & Johanson is the world’s leading company in powder and bulk solids handling, processing, and storage technology.  Over the past 47 years, we’ve tested over 10,000 unique powders and bulk solids and worked on more than 7,500 projects, giving our team the broadest real-world and in-depth experience in the industry to address the widest possible variety of bulk material handling and engineering needs.

About the Enterprise Bank Celebration of Excellence Awards

Enterprise Bank’s Celebration of Excellence Awards recognize the dedication, the long hours, fortitude, perseverance, and vision necessary to grow a successful business, make a real difference in the lives of families and employees, educate our children, and become an important contributor to the livelihood of the communities we call home. Inaugurated in 2008, Enterprise Bank’s Celebration of Excellence was created as a way to honor amazing individuals by providing them with the public recognition they so richly deserve.

 

 

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How do you handle Biomass?

Those who deal with biomass know it can be very difficult to handle, but why? Let’s compare biomass to bulk materials/powders for a moment. Both bulk materials and biomass have internal friction, can form piles, are sensitive to pressure, and are compressible. In addition, biomass can be springy, have a high aspect ratio, and have particles align. Biomass also covers an exceedingly wide variety of materials. Because of these differences, our approach to characterizing the flowability of biomass must adapt to overcome flow challenges.

Typical bulk material handling challenges include bridging/arching, ratholing, erratic flow, varying bulk density, segregation, caking, etc. With powders, we run small-scale tests to characterize the flowability of the material e.g. cohesive strength, wall friction, permeability, and bulk density. With biomass materials, common issues are bridging over large spans (even up in the cylinder of a silo) and ratholing – resulting in limited live capacity, fermenting in stagnant regions, and potentially spontaneous combustion. The flow characteristics of biomass can change even when sitting for a short time in a bin. To measure the flowability of biomass we use large-scale tests for flowability characterization to provide information required for design. Without that characterization, there is no real basis for design of bins, hoppers, feeders, and transfer chutes. It is critical that the tests match process conditions such as moisture content, particle size, and time at rest.

We have worked on biomass projects handling sawdust, wood powder, wood chips, bark, municipal solids wastes, forest residues, sorghum, seed and hulls, chopped straw, switch grasses, and corn stover. We often find that clients are unaware of biomass flowability testing. Their focus is often on the conversion of biomass for high yield, but little attention is given to flow characteristics. The end result is devastating when they are only able to operate at 30-40% of process/plant design for years because of material handling issues.

Let’s work together to ensure the correct handling system is installed the first time. Please reach out to us anytime to discuss a project, even if you don’t know if our involvement will be needed at the time.

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Components in Storage Structure for Bulk Solids – Hopper Attachment in Bins and Silos (Part 3)

Co-Author: Jesús Chávez Sagarnaga

My definition of “hopper” is a sloped wall converging structure suspended along its top edge from the vertical wall portion of the bin or silo. Hoppers can be conical, wedge, pyramidal or a combination of these shapes. These converging parts are necessary and provide a practical means of directing and concentrating the discharge of the bin/silo contents to a specific point where it can be efficiently handled. Flow problems aside, it is hard to think of bins and silos without hoppers. I am primarily talking about circular silos constructed of welded steel with conical hoppers for the purpose of this discussion, although it applies to the other types of hoppers as well.

Depending on the size of the silo, the converging structure must safely hold up its contents along with the contents of the cylinder section that it is attached to. The material in the cylinder above the hopper can press down with loads as high as 50%-70% of the bin/silo contents. Most conical hoppers are generally thin plate type structures that are welded to the cylinder shells, which can also be constructed from a thin plate or something heavier like a built-up ring girder. The thin hopper plate behaves as a tensile membrane structure that moves (strains) relative to the cylinder at the attachment point as the silo is filled and emptied.

The key issue here is the welded joint that is used to attach the hopper section (see figure above). We at Jenike & Johanson have inspected many of these type weld joints and found some of them to be improperly installed when the bin/silo was initially fabricated. The weld joint is typically specified during the design phase to have a complete penetration fillet weld, but because of the limited access to the joint during the welding process, the weld metal does not penetrate the thickness of the hopper wall and can be as little as half the thickness (see photo). This reduced cross-section at the weld creates high tensile stresses in the joint. Furthermore, the movements of the hopper shell as the bin/silo is filled and emptied can cold-work (fatigue) this joint to the point of failure. We have investigated past catastrophic failures and identified this mechanism as the root cause. This unnecessary scenario ends in equipment damage, facility shutdown and sometimes the loss of life. Often during the inspection, we observe cracks in the attachment joint before the complete (catastrophic) separation of the conical hopper occurs.

GJP_Blog_Transition_JointThe hopper attachment joints on all bins and silos should be inspected during fabrication or construction, and then at some interval established after the first inspection. Jenike & Johanson recommends at minimum that a qualified structural engineer specialized in bin/silo structures visually inspects this important attachment joint. So the question is: Is the attachment of your hopper safe?

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Components in Storage Structure for Bulk Solids – Buckling in Metal Cylinders (pt2)

Co-Author: Jesús Chávez Sagarnaga

Bunkers, bins and silos are containment structures used to store bulk solids. A common component in these structures is a metallic cylinder where most of the bulk solid is stored. One of the critical failure modes for metal cylinders is local buckling. Buckling is the result of structural instability, making the structure unable to withstand the imparted compressive loads. This normally results in large deformations where the structure finds a new geometry of equilibrium. Generally, when a structure fails by buckling, the compressive stress does not exceed the metal yield stress but exceeds the critical compressive stress, which dependents on the structure’s geometry and material properties.

The critical compressive stress for cylindrical shells depends on the shell geometry (radius and thickness of shell) and properties of the material of construction. The theoretical value for elastic local buckling stress of an axially compressed cylinder assumes a perfect shell free of imperfections. However, shells are very sensitive to imperfections. Surface imperfections include dents, wrinkles, uneven thickness loss etc. Surface imperfections always exist in cylindrical shells fabricated in structural fabricating shops. Real cylindrical shells that are axially compressed usually buckle at stresses smaller than the theoretical value.

To explain the importance of surface imperfections in thin shells, we will use the example of a soda can. When an empty soda can is loaded axially, it can sustain a higher load compared to a soda can that has experienced a level of deformation (e.g. dent or dimple). To demonstrate this, we performed a simple experiment by axially loading three empty soda cans (see video below). One of the soda cans without any noticeable surface imperfection was loaded until it failed by buckling. We repeated this experiment with the other two soda cans; however, for the second one we introduced very small surface imperfections (e.g. dents) and for the third one the level of imperfections was even higher. The values at which each can failed by buckling are presented in the table below. This clearly shows how the buckling capacity is significantly affected by surface imperfections.

In bins and silos the shear traction imposed by the stored material on the internal face of the cylinder wall produces compression along the height of the cylinder. Roof loads and self-weight also contribute to the compressive loads imposed on the cylinder walls. This compression can cause local buckling on the cylindrical shell if the shell is not thick enough. Once the cylinder in the storage structure is sufficiently over-stressed, irreversible deformation occurs. Sometimes, fill and discharge cycles can cold-work these buckles back-and-forth. This can actually rupture the wall if thin enough, since the bending stresses become very high. Unless this problem is corrected, silo collapse is inevitable, which often results in significant property damage and possible loss of life.

It is important that all personnel in industrial facilities be vigilant about these signs of distress (e.g. buckles, dents, holes) and not ignore them so appropriate actions can be taken to avoid tragic events due to structural failures.

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What’s the solution so I know how to budget the project?

This is a common question we are asked by clients with bulk solids flow problems in their plant. Typical problems might be:

  • Segregation and blending issues resulting in product reject
  • Material bridging/arching and ratholing in a bin causing a no-flow or erratic flow
  • Transfer chutes plugging or experiencing excessive wear
  • Caking of powders causing customer complaints
  • Higher throughput is required in the plant, but the pneumatic conveying line, feeder, transfer system…insert any other part of your plant here…can’t keep up

In order to make a change, it is critical to determine the root cause of the problem(s) and determine the correct path forward to avoid the costly trial and error approach. Sometimes the solution may be a simple change that can be completed using maintenance or operations budget. Other times, the change may require capital budget.

Many capital budgets are getting approved for 2018. Now is the time to have us come on-site and engineer a solution for you so you know if you need to get the project in the upcoming budget cycle – or if you have the funds to fix it now with existing budget.

No one likes to deal with flow issues – not only are they a headache, but they often result in loss profit. So let us provide a remedy to your flow problem to see how you can move forward with your project.

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Feasibility Study Assistance

Pre-feasibility study, feasibility study, front-end-loading (FEL 1 and 2), whatever you might call the upfront work in deciding whether or not a bulk solids handling project should go through, we can help. A feasibility study is the analysis of how successfully a project can be completed. We can assess technical feasibility by providing or reviewing conceptual designs/layouts and cost estimates for bulk solids handling projects.

All too often the technical portion of the feasibility study with regards to the flow of bulk materials gets missed and is pushed to a later part of the project. Often cut and paste designs are used from previous projects as holding points without accounting for the flowability of the material. Then the project is built around false assumptions that are not always revisited once the project moves forward into the design stage.

One time, I went to a new plant that had a unique hopper and feeder design not suited for the material. The feeder could not start up when the silo was full because of the load on the feeder. Even when it did run, material sat stagnant in the silo and would self-combust. Not only was the plant unable to operate, it also had to deal with fire and safety issues. In speaking with the operators, they couldn’t understand how such a system was installed. The best guess was that the design was copied and pasted from a different plant during the feasibility stage and was never revisited in the design phase. The cost of modifications after construction is complete is significantly higher than planning the correct design during the concept development phase as seen in the chart below.

Using our 51 years of bulk solids expertise, we can guide you down the correct road so that the feasibility study is based on sound assumptions with regards to flow.

Your feasibility study is only as good as your assumptions. Let us be a part of your team or run your feasibility study altogether. We’ve worked in all industries and can put our experience to action with your company to develop conceptual designs, perform feasibility studies, and cost estimates to best support you in your effort to have a successful project.

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Jenike and Johanson presents award for high achievement in Bulk Solids Science at the Western Australian School of Mines

May, 2017 Perth, Australia

Jenike and Johanson is proud to award Dirk Oskar Garland the Jenike and Johanson Prize for highest grade in bulk materials component of PRRE2002 at the Western Australian School of Mines, Kalgoorlie Campus.

Dirk Garland, winner of the Jenike and Johanson Prize for highest grade in bulk materials component of PRRE2002, receiving his award from Professor John Cordery, Provost and Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor at Curtin University

We asked Dirk about some of his thoughts on Bulk Solids handling:

What was it about bulk solids that attracted you to it and to apply yourself so passionately?

The fundamentals of bulk solids science are reasonably simple and the approaches to solving problems are quite systematic, which is something that I can appreciate. I think what really drew me in was how easy it was to see the real world applications of the theory.

What aspect of bulk solids science did you find the most interesting during your studies?

My studies have included a ‘materials handling’ unit that focussed on bins and hoppers and the behaviour of bulk solids. I found the interactions between individual particles and the effects of moisture on those interactions to be quite interesting, especially since it then has follow-on effects on systems like bins and hoppers.

What was the most surprising thing you learnt about the behaviour of bulk solids?

The thing I found most surprising was the fact that many mining operators dealing with bulk solids did not regularly check and improve their systems. I would have thought this to be common practice, as everybody is aiming for maximum productivity and efficiency, which is certainly something that should be applied to such an important part of an operation.

Things are changing in mining and while there will always be a need for the basic science, the way it is applied may change? How do you think things might go in the future?

I can see that the major focus of science in the mining industry is heavily shifting towards the automation of operations. Technology is increasingly becoming a major component of the industry with the introduction of systems like the Internet of Things (IoT) and even on a small scale like using drones for surveying and monitoring purposes. I think improvements and changes in processing technologies will have a large effect on bulk materials science and will perhaps introduce new types of materials, with new challenges to face.

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Jenike and Johanson presents award for high achievement in Bulk Solids Science at the University of Newcastle

June, 2017 Perth, Australia
Jenike and Johanson is proud to award Ryan Stiff and Zoe Scott the Jenike and Johanson Prize for high achievement in Bulk Solids Science at the University of Newcastle Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics Dinner.


Ryan Stiff, winner of the Jenike and Johanson Prize for excellence in Bulk Solids Science, receiving his award from the Head of University of Newcastle’s School of Mechanical Engineering Professor Mark Jones.

Ryan Stiff
We asked Ryan some question about his education on bulk solids, here are his responses.

What aspect of bulk solids science did you find the most interesting during your studies?
I found it to be a very interesting course because of its difference to the other courses I have completed. Rather than looking at a single component or multiple interacting components it was all about the interaction of millions of individual particles and all the ways they could interact with each other and the environment they are in.
What was the most surprising thing you learnt about the behaviour of bulk solids?
It was not as linear as I thought it would be. Coming into the course I believed it would be as simple as just adding more conveyor belts, adding a chute to change height, or just increasing the pipe length but it is more complex than that. Every system has to be designed for its own purpose and no system can be just copied from another without important alterations to be made.
Things are changing and while there will always be a need for the basic science, the way it is applied may change? How do you think things might go in the future?
I think in the future there will be more systems developed that reduce the need to perform large batches of calculations. There are already programs that allow simulations of bulk solid material transportation and as the industry further develops these programs will become more sophisticated and have faster processing times. For engineers, it will be smarter designing and optimizing existing systems that will continue to become important rather than having to spend time on calculating for simpler designs.


Zoe Scott
We asked Zoe about her education on bulk solids, here are her responses.

Zoe Scott, winner of the Jenike and Johanson Prize for High Achievement in Bulk Solids Science, receiving her award from the Head of University of Newcastle’s School of Mechanical Engineering Professor Mark Jones.

What was it about bulk solids that attracted you to it and to apply yourself so passionately?
The incredible volume of material that is handled daily locally and in the rest of Australia made me want to find out more about the way it is transported and the engineering behind those methods. Materials handling is such a large industry that’s rarely spoken about and I just had to know more about it.
What aspect of bulk solids science did you find the most interesting during your studies?
I most enjoyed studying overland conveyors and learning about all the different contributing factors to calculating belt tensions. It was interesting to see the amount of science that goes into the designing of a conveyor and how dependent their design is on the material and flow characteristics.
What was the most surprising thing you learnt about the behaviour of bulk solids?
I had no idea that different materials had a different angle of repose, or that that angle even had a name! I’d not thought about it much before. It seems so simple and obvious now, but learning about it for the first was really interesting.
Things are changing and while there will always be a need for the basic science, the way it is applied may change? How do you think things might go in the future?
As systems become more and more automated and companies demand longer systems with a larger throughput, new ways of handling materials will need to be developed. Also, the types of things we will be dealing with will change as renewable energy replaces coal fired power stations.


About Jenike & Johanson, Inc.
Jenike & Johanson is the world’s leading company in powder and bulk solids handling, processing, and storage technology.  Over the past 55 years, we’ve tested over 10,000 unique powders and bulk solids and worked on more than 7,500 projects, giving our team the broadest real-world and in-depth experience in the industry to address a wide variety of bulk material handling and engineering needs.

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Silo inspection: Be proactive not reactive

Changing the oil in my car may be the least favorite chore that I have to do on a regular basis. Taking 30 minutes to sit in a garage while the oil is drained and replaced is a huge hassle, who does’t feel that way? $30 and 30 minutes is a small price we pay to keep our cars running. The alternative is replacing the engine in the car for approximately $4,000 after the engine destroys itself. Personally, I would rather pay the maintenance cost than replacement cost. Just like your car needs regular maintenance your bulk handling storage system needs some attention to keep it running.

It is believed that many bulk solids storage structures (e.g. silos, bins) failures occur suddenly without any signal or warning. However, most of the time the structure shows signs of distress for a period of time until those are too obvious or have caused the structure to fail. Many of these failures are easily preventable through routine inspection and maintenance. Many structural issues can be easily and economically addressed if detected in time. Prevention is the most cost-effective way to ensure the structural integrity of concrete and metal silos. A proactive inspection and maintenance program is crucial to extend the life of bins and silos and ensure the safety of those working around them.

Time, weather, and usage all are contributors to the degradation of bulk solids storage structures. This degradation can eventually translate in structural failures with the potential of becoming catastrophic ones. The signs of degradation and the failures observed are different in concrete and metal silos. For example in concrete silos those signs can be observed in the form of silo wall delamination, cracks and rebar corrosion. For metal silos, those signs include wall deformations, cracks, wear and corrosion.

A proactive program includes routine inspections to check for concealed damage and to assess visible degradation, which increases the risk of structural failures in bulk solids storage structures. Most of the times, failures can be prevented or the structural damage can be minimized based on the information collected through routine inspections. Unfortunately, a simple visual inspection is not always enough for a complete understanding of the structural integrity of bins and silos that have been in service for several years. Depending on the deterioration and problems observed as well as the silo type, it may be necessary to obtain more comprehensive studies. For example, it may be necessary to obtain ultrasonic testing to determine current thicknesses of metal plates or core boring in reinforced concrete silos to determine their concrete strength capacity.

The cost of preventive maintenance and repair is minimal when compared to the financial and physical toll that a full collapse can have on your company and team. It does not matter if your bin and/or silo is welded, bolted or concrete in construction, all should be inspected regularly to identify any degradation that has occurred since the last inspection.

If your storage system has shown some type of degradation or you are unsure of its current structural condition and would like to have a better understanding of the system, we at Jenike & Johanson have the technical and practical knowledge necessary to conduct a thorough inspection of your storage system. We can inspect as well as implement inspection procedures to assess the condition of your storage systems and, ultimately, avoid failures. Do not hesitate to contact us with questions you may have, we are here to help.

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Training – you get the “bang for your buck”?!

Let me ask a simple question – can you recall the last time you received effective training that yielded an immediate payback/return-on-investment (ROI)?

If you can recall this training event, can you think why it was effective and impactful?  What could you check-off below to indicate success?

  • Content directly applies to how I do my job
  • Content focused on “why’s” and “how’s” for awareness and execution of a task
  • Content provided a “safe space” to make mistakes that allow discovery
  • Content was practical and not too theoretical or filled with too many hypotheticals
  • Content contained humor, stories, or case studies to accentuate learnings

All too often, L&D (learning & development) initiatives have been boiled down to “critical-to-know” topics that are deployed through one-way e-learning tools, such as webinars, training portals, or hand-books with quizzes focused on memorization.

IfWeTrainThem

We at Jenike & Johanson strive to provide highly effective training on the complex phenomena of powder and bulk solids flow and transport.  Our “in-person” L&D events are delivered by expert instructors that know how to train and provide experience-based learnings that can directly impact your bottom-line through improvements in bulk material handling efficiency, safety, and quality.

For example, we’ve delivered several recent training courses on bulk material flow and transport that yielded the following high ROI improvements for our customers:

  • 15% increase over design throughput capacity for the production of clinker
  • Prevention of combustible dust flash fire and dust explosion hazards with sugar
  • Elimination of fine powder buildup and plugging in a pneumatic conveying line
  • De-bottlenecking of coal transfer chute pluggages and aggressive abrasive wear

We have multiple ways to deliver impactful training to you and your team.  Our in-house courses  are world-renown for their solid technical basis, professional delivery, and targeted content.  We can custom-craft a one day, two day, or three day training event that focuses on bulk material handling improvements that can directly improve your bottom-line.  We’ve delivered hundreds of these sought-after courses throughout our 50 years in business.

 

We also present courses through the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).  In fact, we’ve delivered our AIChE courses three to four times per year around the US for the past 40 years.  Our next AIChE offering this May 2 – 4 in Seattle; come join us!

If you want to audit one of our courses, why not start with our upcoming one-day course at our Tyngsboro, Massachusetts office this June 15?

We look forward to seeing you at a J&J training event!  Please contact us with any questions.

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Perry’s Chemical Engineers’ Handbook

greg_mehosI own all eight editions of Perry’s Chemical Engineers’ Handbook. The ninth edition will be issued this year, and Dr. John Carson and I have written the section on bulk solids flow and hopper design. The ninth edition will include our prose!

When we were asked to contribute to the edition, I perused my previous editions to see how the subject of bulk solids handling was treated. The first edition was published in 1934. In addition to a short section on bulk solids storage and transport, the first edition of Perry’s included a section on how to use a slide rule, and its periodic table only included 73 elements. My grandfather was a chemical engineer, and I sometimes wonder if he used the first edition. I’m certain he used a slide rule. Recommendations for storing bulk materials were terse and advised “mechanical or air agitators for materials that are likely to clog the outlet.”

Perrys_Blog

The text on bulk solids storage and handling remained essentially untouched in the second and third editions. When the fourth edition was published in 1963, the section was considerably revised. Guidelines included the following gems:

“Bins usually increase in economy as their height and diameters increases (sic). Best proportion for good flow of solids is obtained when bins are large in cross section and comparatively shallow. Materials are less apt to pack in such bins because of lower overhead material weight.”

and

“No hopper is included in some bin designs; residual bin contents are removed manually. Hoppers actually create most bin problems and the ideal bin would not include a hopper.”

When the fourth edition of Perry’s was published, Andrew Jenike had not yet published Bulletin 123, so it’s not surprising that the editors were not fond of hoppers. Before Jenike developed appropriate bulk solids tests, including cohesive strength, compressibility, wall friction, and permeability, designs were based on rules of thumb or ease of calculations or fabrication.

In the fifth edition published in 1973, Perry’s Handbook included Jenike’s test and design methods. The fifth edition was the first to describe solids flow patterns, shear cell test methods, and Jenike’s “design criteria” for hoppers, bins and silos. The fifth edition praised Jenike’s work and noted that engineers could now design bulk solids handling plants with the same level of confidence they had when designing processes for liquids and gases.

The subsection on bulk solids handling remained largely the same in the sixth and seventh editions. However, methods for designing hoppers, bins, and silos do not appear in the current eighth edition. Fortunately, Karl Jacob (Dow Chemical Company), the editor of the bulk solids handling and transport section of the ninth edition of Perry’s Chemical Engineers’ Handbook, asked Jenike & Johanson to contribute. I look forward to adding the ninth edition to my collection!

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